Education

Conceptual Framework

The mission of the School of Education is to prepare highly effective educators, school counselors, and school leaders who believe in full inclusion, who value diversity, who are reflective, and who are knowledgeable about best practices. Therefore, we ask Sage educators, counselors, and leaders to consider two essential questions throughout their studies and field experiences: Who am I in the lives of those with whom I work? Who am I in the life of my educational community? We expect all Sage candidates to demonstrate leadership and create optimal educational outcomes for all learners.

The motto of Russell Sage College, “To Be, To Know, To Do,” informs the educational purpose of Russell Sage College, where the common effort is to translate learning into action and application, within a framework that recognizes the obligation of educated persons to lead and serve their communities. This motto is extended to form the basis for our programs.

Conceptual Framework: An underlying structure in a professional education unit that gives conceptual meanings through an articulated rationale to the unit’s operation, and provides direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate performance, faculty scholarship and service, and unit accountability.
 

T-BIRDS — The key concepts of the conceptual framework:

  • Technology: a vehicle for learners to acquire information, practice skills, use higher order thinking skills, and participate in collaborative projects.
  • Best Practices: the pedagogical knowledge, skills and practices that have been shown through research and evaluation to be effective and/or efficient and that candidates use to teach all learners.
  • Inclusion and Diversity: the ability to collaborate and team with other professionals in developing and implementing strategies to accommodate diverse learners; and the ability to develop solutions that will enhance the learning experiences of all children; and the ability of candidates to be aware of and sensitive to diversity issues and to use culturally and socially responsive pedagogy.
  • Reflection: the ability to reflect and assess one’s own effectiveness, and to systematically make adjustments to improve and strengthen areas needing attention.
  • Dispositions: the demonstration of respect for learner differences, commitment to own personal growth, and engagement in short and long-term planning.
  • Service Learning: the strategies that integrate meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich children’s learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.

These elements are interrelated and integrated to prepare teacher candidates to assume roles as reflective facilitators of learning, combining knowledge and skills to exemplify those qualities and dispositions that characterize effective teachers.

National Accreditation

The School of Education received National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) accreditation in October 2001 (http://www.ncate.org). 

Why does NCATE matter?

  1. From a student’s perspective, NCATE accreditation means that you will graduate from a program in Education that meets the highest standards in the field. You should make sure to note NCATE accreditation on your resume and be prepared to talk about the significance of this designation.
  2. Few colleges and universities can claim this recognition. In New York State we are one of a small number of institutions accredited by NCATE. Across the nation, only 200 private colleges can claim NCATE accreditation. It is prestigious and difficult to achieve.
  3. If you are applying for certification in other states, graduating from our NCATE programs will facilitate your receiving licensure in another state.
  4. NCATE has helped us to articulate what qualities a Sage educator/counselor possesses. Our tenets – belief in full inclusion, valuing diversity, knowledge about best practices and reflection – will hold you in good stead as teachers/counselors and help you, we believe, articulate and distinguish your strengths in these broad areas.
  5. Many of the portfolio assessments and documentation of pupils’ learning are similar to tasks required for National Board Certification; we believe that NCATE has helped us to prepare better graduates who are able to help their students reach high standards. As you go forth in your career, we hope that you will find the kinds of experiences you received at Sage helpful as you seek to improve your professionalism.

National Accreditation Advantage

The Esteves School of Education has held continuous accreditation from the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE/CAEP) since October 2001. NCATE/CAEP accreditation means that graduates are recognized as having completed an Education program that meets the highest standards in the field. Sage graduates should note the NCATE/CAEP accreditation on their resumes and be prepared to talk about its significance.

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

EDU 502 : Critical Thinking: Research Into Practice

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates with strategies for locating and analyzing educational research. Research studies exemplifying the best of quantitative and qualitative traditions will be examined, candidates will critically read experimental, correlational, survey, ethnographic, single subject design, and teacher inquiry studies available in refereed educational journals. Technology will be used throughout the course, particularly in library research. The purpose of the course is for teachers and teacher candidates to develop critical thinking skills for reading research and drawing conclusions about its implications for classroom instruction.

EDU 503 : Teaching All Learners in Elementary Schools

This course investigates best practices in delivering instruction in inclusive settings. Emphasis is on planning for multi-level structured learning experiences for students with diverse characteristics. Interventions for diverse teaching challenges are investigated within the context of inclusive classrooms. A variety of teaching strategies are presented, critiqued, and practiced, based on a philosophy of interactive and reflective teaching. Candidates develop knowledge about autism, multiple learning styles, the full range of learner characteristics, partnerships with parents and other educational personnel and developing critical thinking skills in students in grades 1-6. Fieldwork required.

EDU 505 : Topics in Developmental & Educational Psychology

This course provides a survey o the most common developmental and educational theories and most popular applicaitons for preschool and school age children (early childhood, childhood, and adolesence).  This class fulfills the requirements for both Developmental Psychology and Educational Psychology for graduate students in the Sage School of Education M.S. and M.A.T. programs.

In this online course, students are expected to participate in the course several times weekly.  Students will participate through group discussion (forums), online quizzes and tests, review and creation of PowerPoint materials, as well as submission of all course assignments online.  Minimum requirements for participation in the course include a computer with high speed internet connection, a 2003 or more recent operating system, Microsoft Office Suite (including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint) and facility in the use of internet sources.

EDU 507 : Responsive Classrooms: Valuing All Learners

This is a survey course that addresses the content and pedagogical knowledge required for teacher preparation programs.  Its primary aim is to give a theoretical overview for the impact of race, culture, economics, language and special education related services for K-12 students.

EDU 511 : Lit for Interdisciplinary Courses

This course presents both theoretical foundations and practical strategies for constructivist, inquiry based approaches that connect learning across the content areas in the secondary school. The focus of this course is using literacy to learn, preparing adolescent students who are better able to understand, recall and apply academic course content. Incorporating New York State Learning Standards as a framework for instructional planning, emphasis is placed on multilevel planning and differentiated instruction that engage at-risk learners, including students with special needs, pupils acquiring English as a second language and reluctant learners evidencing negative attitudes toward learning. M.A.T. candidates enrolled in EDU-511 must concurrently enroll in EDU-511F (fieldwork). All other candidates enrolled in EDU-511 are required to prepare an additional critique of a current text pertaining to adolescent reading and writing.

EDU 512 : Contemporary Middle School Edu

This course explores the nature of teaching and learning in the middle school. Curriculum and pedagogical decisions are based on the needs of the young adolescent in contemporary society. Interdisciplinary instruction and responsive teaching that actively engage middle school learners in the school community are considerations in the course.

EDU 521 : Literacy in Middle School

An examination of the multiple literacies of middle school students and the teacher's responsibilities in guiding young adolescents' literacy development across the curricula are the major features of this course. Emphasis is placed in developing strategies for readers/writers and assisting struggling learners to mature.

EDU 522 : Teaching in Math, Science & Technology

This course is designed to help students employ inquiry strategies to teach mathematics, science and technology (MST) according to national and NYS Learning Standards. Multilevel instruction integrating mathematics, science and technology (MST) will be the focus of this course, with emphasis on processes of analysis, inquiry and design; using information systems processes to understand MST; designing instructional models for integrated MST instruction for delivery in heterogeneous and diverse classes; designing innovative, principled uses of information technology for improving instruction in MST; and integrating MST with applications to interdisciplinary problem-solving. This course must be taken concurrently with EDU-523.

EDU 523 : Teaching in the Humanities

Multi-level instruction integrating social studies the arts, reading, writing and oral language based on national and NYS Learning Standards will be the focus of this course, with emphases on knowledge of the academic disciplines in the humanities, constructive pedagogies and complex instruction models in heterogeneous and diverse classes. Planning curricula will be directed toward learners' unique characteristics and cultures as well as their overall development in knowledge and learning. This course should be taken concurrently with EDU-522.

EDU 531 : School Residency I Gr 1-3

In School Residency I, residents are placed in a general education classroom in grades 1-3 with an attending teacher and assume up to 20% of classroom duties.  They attend all associated meetings and superintendent days. Residents teach under a NYS Resident's License and may substitute for their attending teacher.

EDU 534 : School Residency I Gr 4-6

In School Residency I, residents are placed in a general education classroom in grades 4-6 with an attending teacher and assume up to 20% of classroom duties.  They attend all associated meetings and superintendent days.  Residents teach under a NYS Resident's License and may substitute for their attending teacher.

EDU 541 : School Residency II Gr 1-3

In School Residency II, residents are placed in a general education classroom in grades 1-3 with an attending teacher and assume up to 40% of classroom duties.  They attend all associated meetings and superintendent days.  Residents teach under a NYS Resident's License and may substitute for their attending teacher.

Prerequisites

EDU-531

EDU 544 : School Residency II Gr 4-6

In School Residency II, residents are placed in a general education classroom in grades 4-6 with an attending teacher and assume up to 40% of classroom duties.  They attend all associated meetings and superintendent days.  Residents teach under a NYS Resident's License and may substitute for their attending teacher.

Prerequisites

EDU-534

EDU 545 : Technology and Literacy

This course examines the theoretical framework and practical applications of technology and digital literacies in contemporary teaching in schools.  Special attention is given to how digital literacies are supported by the Common Core State Standards.  Specific course topics pertain to research about the multimodal and social nature of the new literacies, critical media literacy, comprehending and composing in digital forms, identity construction, podcasting, screencasting, photography and graphic arts, multimedia productions, social media, differentiating instruction, and assessing students' knowledge and performance with digital literacies and assistive technology.  A variety of Web tools and related skills to enhance the teaching of content is discussed and used in construction of a personal website.

EDU 555 : Childhood Teaching Methods

This course is designed to instruct students on pedagogical methods in all childhood (grades 1-6) subject areas - Mathematics, Science, Technology, English/Language Arts, Art, Music and Physical Education as aligned to New York State Common Core Standards.  There is an emphasis on multilevel instruction, processes of analysis, inquiry and design, constructive pedagogies, multiple intelligences, academic language and interdisciplinary problem solving.  Planning curricula are directed toward culturally responsive instruction that addresses the diverse learning needs of elementary level (grades 1-6) students.  50 hours of fieldwork required.

EDU 572 : Assessment Approaches

This is an introductory course in educational assessment and evaluation. It examines issues pertaining to the interpretation of school-wide, classroom, and individual assessment information. Specific topics include principles and concepts in assessment, standardized testing, performance-based and teacher made assessment strategies.

EDU 574 : Reading and Writing in the Content Areas

Methods and materials for delivering content area instruction through reading and writing are examined.  Instruction design that develops literacy skills and broadens and enriches student learning of academic subjects is explored.  Fieldwork required.

EDU 576 : Emergent Language & Literature

This course explores how language acquisition contributes to literacy development. Particular attention is paid to emergent reading and writing and the interrelationships of language learning, literacy development, and children's interactions with literature. Effective teaching practices for including children with disabilities in inclusive classrooms are examined.  25 hours of fieldwork are required.

EDU 578 : Collaboration in Educational Settings

Students will examine theories and practices of collaboration in school settings. Strategies for developing effective team approaches with special education personnel, other school staff and parents will be analyzed and discussed.

EDU 579 : Social Justice Through Reading Adolescence & Childhood Literature

Designed for childhood, literacy and special education teachers and teacher candidates, the course requires students to critically analyze children's literature for its depiction of concepts, events, and protagonists pertaining to social justice. Candidates review the professional literature related to children's literature, its impact on instruction and the extent to which children's literature replicates and or advances educational systems' inclusion of diverse populations.

EDU 588 : Building Learning Communities

Course cultivates experience in planning, implementing and evaluating a variety of individual and group management techniques in childhood level classrooms. Both instructional management and classroom management are examined as means of increasing pupils' time on task and opportunity to learn. Student-teacher interaction models are also explored.  25 hours of fieldwork are required.

EDU 594 : Teacher-Researcher-Portfolio

This course is prerequisite to Student Teaching. Candidates focus on the applications of research in teaching grades 1 - 12. A literature review is completed and a research project designed.

EDU 599 : Topic:

This course is designed for in-depth discussion and analysis of one major educational topic. This is a multi-sectional course with each section centering upon one topic of national importance which has both immediate and long-range educational implications. The content is focused upon those factors which may be causing the topic to remain visible and the variety of ways in which concerns are expressed.

EDU 611 : School Residency III Gr 1-3

In School Residency III, residents are placed in a general education classroom in grades 1-3 with an attending teacher and assume up to 50-100% of classroom duties.  They attend all associated meetings and superintendent days.  Residents teach under a NYS Resident's License and may substitute for their attending teacher.

Prerequisites

EDU-541

EDU 614 : School Residency III Gr 4-6

In School Residency III, residents are placed in a general education classroom in grades 4-6 with an attending teacher and assume up to 50-100% of classroom duties.  They attend all associated meetings and superintendent days.  Residents teach under a NYS Resident's License and may substitute for their attending teacher.

Prerequisites

EDU-544

EDU 621 : School Residency IV Gr 1-3

In School Residency IV, residents are placed in sister school situation in general education classroom in grades 1-3 with a cooperating teacher for six weeks and assume all classroom duties.  They return to their host school classroom with their initial attending teacher and subsequently substitute in a number of elementary grade levels to expand their experiences.  Residents teach under a NYS Resident's License and may substitute for their attending teacher.

Corequisites

EDU-611

EDU 624 : School Residency IV Gr 4-6

In School Residency IV, residents are placed in sister school situation in general education classroom in grades 4-6 with a cooperating teacher for six weeks and assume all classroom duties.  They return to their host school classroom with their initial attending teacher and subsequently substitute in a number of elementary grade levels to expand their experiences.  Residents teach under a NYS Resident's License and may substitute for their attending teacher.

Prerequisites

EDU-614

EDU 649 : Student Teaching/Elementary I

This course provides the final clinical component for the teacher candidate in Grades 1-3 as fulfillment of the requirements for initial state-level licensure in Childhood Education.  This seven (7) week student teaching experience is closely monitored by a college faculty supervisor and mentor teacher to facilitate the skills, knowledge, pedagogical practice and overall professional experience in the elementary class setting.  Students planning to student teach in the Summer or Fall semesters must request placement in the first two weeks of the Spring semester.  Students planning to student teach in the Spring semester must request placement in the first two weeks of the Fall semester.  Candidate must have the approval of their program advisor.  A fee of $250 is required for each placement.  The fee is nonrefundable after August 1 for fall semester and after December 15 for spring semester.

EDU 650 : Student Teaching/Elementary II

This course provides the final clinical component for the teacher candidate in Grades 4-6 as fulfillment of the requirements for initial state-level licensure in Childhood Education.  This seven (7) week student teaching experience is closely monitored by a college faculty supervisor and mentor teacher to facilitate the skills, knowledge, pedagogical practice and overall professional experience in the elementary class setting.  Students planning to student teach in the Summer or Fall semesters must request placement in the first two weeks of the Spring semester.  Students planning to student teach in the Spring semester must request placement in the first two weeks of the Fall semester.  Candidate must have the approval of their program advisor.  A fee of $250 is required for each placement.  The fee is nonrefundable after August 1 for fall semester and after December 15 for spring semester.

EDU 656 : Adolescence Education Internship 7-9

The college establishes the teaching internship for one semester of the public school calendar (i.e., September-January or February-June) for junior high/middle school prospective teachers who have satisfied the content requirements for certification in New York State. Preservice teachers spend half of each day actively engaged in teaching their content in grades 7-9. This experience satisfies the NYS certification requirement for student teaching. Students planning to enter the internship must request a placement in the spring semester (by March 15) preceding their internship year. A $250 fee is required for each placement.

Prerequisites

MTA 578

EDU 657 : Adolescence Education Internship 10-12

The college establishes the teaching internship for one semester of the public school calendar (i.e., September-January or February-June) for high school prospective teachers who have satisfied the content requirements for certification in New York State. Preservice teachers spend half of each day actively engaged in teaching their content in grades 10-12s experience satisfies the NYS certification requirement for student teaching. Students planning to enter the internship must request a placement in the spring semester (by March 15) preceding their internship year. A $250 fee is required for each placement.

Prerequisites

MTA 578

EDU 658 : Adolescence Student Teaching 7-9

Practice teaching in grades 7-9 for prospective content teachers is arranged by the college in each spring semester for candidates who have completed all coursework in the M.A.T. program with the exception of EDU 594, and who have completed the specified pedagogical and content courses in the Master of Arts in Teaching program. Students planning to student teach must request a placement by the first day of the fall semester preceding the student teaching semester. A $250 fee is required for each placement.

Prerequisites

MTA-578, MTA-502, EDU-511 , the 12 credits required in the content area

EDU 659 : Adolescence Student Teaching 10-12

Practice teaching in grades 10-12 for prospective adolescence educators is arranged by the college in each spring semester for candidates who have completed all coursework in the M.A.T. program with the exception of EDU 594, and who have completed the specified pedagogical and content courses in the Master of Arts in Teaching program. Students planning to student teach must request a placement by the first day of the fall semester preceding the student teaching semester. A $250 fee is required for each placement.

Prerequisites

EDU-511, MTA-502 , MTA-578

EDU 661 : Internship in Art Education (K-6)

The college establishes the teaching internship for one semester of the public school calendar (i.e., October-January or February through May) for prospective art educators. Preservice teachers spend half of each day actively engaging in teaching their content in grades K-6. This experience satisfies the NYS certification requirement for students teaching. An application is required, deadline: March 1 prior to the internship year. A fee of $250 is required for each student teaching placement. This fee is nonrefundable after August 1 for the fall semester and after December 15 for the spring semester.

EDU 662 : Internship in Art Education (7-12)

The college establishes the teaching internship for one semester of the public school calendar(i.e., October-January or February-May) for prospective educators. Perservice teachers spend half of each day actively engaged in teaching their content in grades 7-12. This experience satisfies the NYS certification requirement for students teaching. An application is required, deadline: March 1 prior to the internship year.

Prerequisites

MTA-578

EDU 663 : Student Teaching Art Education (K-6)

Practice teaching in grades K-6 for prospective art educators is arranged by the college for candidates who have completed all coursework in the M.A.T. program with the exception of EDU 594. Application deadline: for fall student teaching, first day of prior spring semester; for spring student teaching, first day of prior fall semester. A fee of $250 is required for each student teaching placement. The fee is nonrefundable after August 1 for the fall semester and after December 15 for the spring semester.

EDU 664 : Student Teaching Art Education (7-12)

Practice teaching in grades 7-12 for prospective art educators is arranged by the college for candidates who have completed all coursework in the M.A.T program with the exception of EDU 594. Application deadline: for fall student teaching, first day of prior spring semester; for spring, first day of prior fall semester. A fee of $250 is required for each student teaching placement. This fee is nonrefundable after August 1 for the fall semester and after December 15 for the spring semester.

EDU 670 : Childhood/Special Education Student Teaching (Gr 1-3)

This course provides the final clinical component for the teacher candidate enrolled in the dual Childhood/Special Education program as fulfillment of the requirements for initial state-level licensure in Childhood Education/Special Education.  This seven (7) week student teaching experience, situated in grades 1-3 in a general education or special education setting, is closely monitored by a college faculty supervisor and mentor teacher to facilitate the skills, knowledge, pedagogical practice and overall professional experience in the elementary/special education class setting.  Student teaching is arranged by the Esteves School of Education each semester.  Candidates must have approval of their program advisor.  Students planning to student teach in the Summer or Fall semesters must request placement in the first two weeks of the Spring semester.  Students planning to student teach in the Spring semester must request placement in the first two weeks of the Fall semester.  A fee of $250 is required for each placement.  The fee is nonrefundable after August 1 for fall semester and after December 15 for spring semester.

EDU 671 : Childhood/Special Education Student Teaching (Gr4-6)

This course provides the final clinical component for the teacher candidate enrolled in the dual Childhood/Special Education program as fulfillment of the requirements for initial state-level licensure in Childhood Education/Special Education.  This seven (7) week student teaching experience, situated in grades 4-6 in a general education or special education setting, is closely monitored by a college faculty supervisor and mentor teacher to facilitate the skills, knowledge, pedagogical practice and overall professional experience in the elementary/special education class setting.  Student teaching is arranged by the Esteves School of Education each semester.  Candidates must have approval of their program advisor.  Students planning to student teach in the Summer or Fall semesters must request placement in the first two weeks of the Spring semester.  Students planning to student teach in the Spring semester must request placement in the first two weeks of the Fall semester.  A fee of $250 is required for each placement.  The fee is nonrefundable after August 1 for fall semester and after December 15 for spring semester.